April 10, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Leeks - Most recipes tell you to cut off the green tops and throw them away… leek greens are much more than “perfectly good food”: Prepared well, they’re utterly spectacular.  Throw them into the pan to soften for few minutes before throwing the white parts in. No special prep needed :)

  • Dandelion Greens - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Oregano - Oregano and garlic pesto is a great way to use up surplus herbs. It is just bursting with bold flavors and tastes great on grilled foods, especially if you are looking for a delicious zesty Mediterranean flavor. Freezes well so you can preserve the season and enjoy year round.  Add 1 c fresh oregano (tightly packed), ½ c grated parmesan cheese, 2 cloves peeled garlic, ½ c raw almonds or walnuts, salt and pepper - to taste - to the bowl of a food processor and grind until the mixture is slightly combined. With the processor still running, slowly stream in ½ c olive oil until the mixture becomes smooth.Store in an airtight container in the fridge, or freeze for later use (see notes for tips).  You can freeze your pesto in ice cube trays. Just pop the mixture into the ice cube tray, freeze, and once frozen remove and store in a ziploc bag until needed.           

  • Celeriac - Make a celeriac and beet salad: Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 425°F.  Wrap 6 medium beets (trimmed, leaving 1-in of stems attached) tightly in foil to make 2 packages (3 beets in each) and roast until tender, about 1 1/4 hours.  While beets roast, peel celeriac with a sharp knife and cut into 1/8-inch-thick matchsticks. Whisk together 2 tbsp plus 2 tsp lemon juice, 2 tbsp minced shallot, ¼ c olive oil, ¾ tsp salt, and pepper to taste in a large bowl until combined well, then add celeriac and toss until coated. Keep at room temperature, covered, until ready to add beets.  Carefully unwrap beets and, when just cool enough to handle, slip off skins and remove stems. Cut beets into 1/8-inch-thick matchsticks and toss with celery root. Let salad stand, covered, at room temperature 1 hour. Taste salad and season with more lemon juice and salt if necessary, then toss with ½ c chopped, toasted and cooled walnuts.

  • Mint - For a yummy, herb-y chicken marinade: Pulse 2 peeled garlic cloves, ½ c fresh mint leaves, 2 tbsp olive oil, and 1 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves in a food processor until very finely chopped; season with 1 tsp kosher salt and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper.  

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Dandelion, Date, and Blue Cheese Salad with Brown Butter Croutons (Serves 4) “Feel free to use any of the leafy greens listed here [in this recipe],” says Bon Appetit. “But dandelion is ideal for its spicy, sturdy leaves.”  Make use of these delicious greens and pair them with other bold flavors for a very special salad!

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

  • 1 cup day-old bread, torn into ¾-inch pieces

  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

  • 1 tablespoon Sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

  • 1 tablespoon (or more) fresh lemon juice

  • 1 large bunch dandelion greens, mature spinach, or arugula, trimmed, leaves torn into 2-inch pieces

  • 5 Medjool dates, pitted, torn into pieces

  • 2 ounces mild dry blue cheese

Cook butter in a medium skillet over medium heat until it foams, then browns and starts to smell nutty, about 4 minutes. Add oil and swirl to combine. Place 2 Tbsp. brown butter in a salad bowl; set aside.

Add bread to skillet, season with salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Cook bread, tossing occasionally, until golden brown and crunchy, about 5 minutes (croutons will crisp more as they cool). Set aside.

Whisk vinegar and lemon juice into reserved browned butter; season dressing with salt and pepper. Add dandelion greens and dates and toss to coat. Taste and season with salt, pepper, and more lemon juice, if desired. Add croutons and blue cheese and gently toss to coat.

Pic of the Week:

throwback chicken pic circa 2014

throwback chicken pic circa 2014

April 3, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Carrots - A go-to dressing for grated carrots is a mix of olive oil (liberal amounts of it), lemon juice, strong mustard, Tabasco sauce, salt, and freshly ground black pepper. Mix, taste, and adjust. Throw in any fresh herbs — cilantro and chervil work especially well — and/or a handful of raisins. Feel free to add other grated vegetables besides carrots, such as radishes or zucchini in the summertime!  The key to a truly juicy carrot salad is to assemble it an hour or two before serving, so the salt can start drawing some of the moisture out of the carrots and into the dressing.

  • Swiss Chard - A fantastic addition to any vegetarian or meaty winter/spring lasagna!

  • Celeriac - One of the most popular things to do with celeriac is make it into a luscious, silky purée.  Bring 3 cups whole milk, 3 cups water, and 1 tbsp salt just to boil in heavy large saucepan over high heat. Add 2 large celeriac (about 2 1/2 lbs  total - peeled, cut into 2-inch cubes), 1 medium russet potato (about 10 oz - peeled, cut into 2-inch cubes), and 1 small onion (peeled and quartered); bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. Drain, discarding cooking liquid.  Combine vegetables and 5 tbsp butter, cut into 5 pieces, in processor and puree until smooth. Season to taste with salt and ground white pepper. Cover and chill. Rewarm in microwave before serving. Transfer purée to bowl. Sprinkle with chopped fresh chives and serve. Note: Celeriac purée can be made 1 day ahead.

  • Leeks - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Rosemary - Some studies showed that the aroma from rosemary can improve a person's concentration, performance, speed, and accuracy and, to a lesser extent, their mood!

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Vegetarian Cassoulet Traditionally, cassoulet is a rich, slow-cooked casserole containing meat, pork skin and white beans, and originated in the south of France. It is named after its traditional cooking vessel, the cassole, a deep, round, earthenware pot with slanting sides.  This is a delicious vegetarian take by Smitten Kitchen, using three(!) items from this week’s box.  But, if you just can’t resist that meat, Deb has some tips below for including sausage.

For cassoulet

  • 3 medium leeks (white and pale green parts only)

  • 4 medium carrots, halved

  • lengthwise and cut into 1-inch-wide pieces

  • ½ celeriac, peeled and diced into 1/2-inch-wide pieces

  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped

  • 1/4 cup olive oil

  • 4 thyme sprigs

  • 2 parsley sprigs

  • 1 Turkish or 1/2 California bay leaf

  • 3 (19-ounce) cans cannellini or Great Northern beans, rinsed and drained or 4 1/2 cups cooked dried beans

  • 1 19-ounce can diced tomatoes, with their juice

  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste

  • 1 quart stock

For garlic crumbs

  • 4 cups coarse fresh bread crumbs from a baguette

  • 1/3 cup olive oil

  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic

  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley

Make cassoulet:

Halve leeks lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces, then wash well and pat dry.

Cook leeks, carrots, celeriac, and garlic in oil with herb sprigs, bay leaf, cloves, and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper in a large heavy pot over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until softened and golden, about 15 minutes. Stir in beans, tomatoes, tomato paste, then stock, and simmer, partially covered, stirring occasionally, until carrots are tender but not falling apart, about 30 minutes.

Make garlic crumbs while cassoulet simmers:

Preheat oven to 350°F with rack in middle.

Toss bread crumbs with oil, garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper in a bowl until well coated. Spread in a baking pan and toast in oven, stirring once halfway through, until crisp and golden, 12 to 15 minutes. Cool crumbs in pan, then return to bowl and stir in parsley.


Finish cassoulet:

Discard herb sprigs and bay leaf. Mash some of beans in pot with a potato masher or back of a spoon to thicken broth. Season with salt and pepper. Just before serving, sprinkle with garlic crumbs.

How about some sausage with that! Slice one pound of cooked sausage into discs and mix with the bean and vegetable stew before adding the breadcrumbs. From here, you can either heat them through for another 15 minutes on the stove, then finish with the breadcrumbs, or add an additional cup of water/broth, scatter that breadcrumbs on top and bake it in a 350°F oven for 20 minutes until the sausage is heated through.

Pic of the Week:

The Fabulous Farmer Fred celebrated a birthday at the end of last month! *<:)

The Fabulous Farmer Fred celebrated a birthday at the end of last month! *<:)

March 27, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Leeks - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Curly Kale Rabe - Similar in shape and size to broccoli rabe, kale rabe is produced when kale plants are overwintered, or left in the soil through the cold months. Once the weather warms up in the spring, the kale goes to seed, and all of the plant's energy is directed toward the flowering stem of new growth at the top of the plant. All that energy translates into an extra-sweet and tender "kale-adjacent" flavor. Get kale rabe while its young, and it will be crunchy, sweet, and excellent stir-fried.  They're also perfect simply finished with a drizzle of soy sauce.

  • Chard -  For wilted chard with shallots and vinegar: Cut 1 bunch chard stems into very small pieces. Tear leaves into 2" pieces and rinse well (you’ll want some water still clinging to the leaves).  Heat 2 tbsp oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Add chard stems, 2 large shallots (thinly sliced into rings), and 2 grated garlic cloves and season with Kosher salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are starting to soften but haven’t taken on any color, about 2 minutes. Add chard leaves, season with salt, and cook, tossing occasionally, until leaves are tender and have released some liquid, about 3 minutes (stems will have a bit of crunch). Mix in 2 tsp sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar; taste and season with more salt if needed.

  • Celeriac - Use a spiralizer to transform celeriac into spaghetti-like strands and topped them with bolognese sauce or a meatless alternative. While it won’t have the same taste or texture as pasta, it is much closer to the real thing than other noodle dupes thanks to its neutral flavour, which really let the tomato sauce shine.

  • Thyme - If a recipe calls for a "sprig" of thyme, the leaves and stem should be used together, intact. When adding a whole sprig of thyme to soups, stews or other recipes, the leaves usually fall off during cooking and the woody stem can be removed prior to serving. To remove the leaves from a sprig of fresh thyme, simply hold the sprig at the top with one hand, pinch the sprig with the other and pull back down the stem. The leaves will detach easily. Fresh thyme leaves are so small that they usually require no chopping.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Soupy Leek Rice (Serves 3-4) “The recipe has no pedigree, no sense, and pretty much no rules. It’s what happens when ingredients you love have no place to go, when they stop waiting for a recipe to join and make one up on their own. Leeks stop acting like a supporting player and go all in, using the entirety of the bunch and the entirety of the leek. Even with numbers, their flavor is still soft and delicate; bolstering with rice and stock elevates them to a meal where they aren’t upstaged. From there, the rest is up to you. If you’d like this dish to commit to being a soup, add more stock; if you’d like it more solid, just let it hang out for 10 minutes and it will set up into a sliceable ricecake. You can add more vegetables that have found themselves stranded in your fridge, stir in leftover scraps of meat that you’re trying to use up, or swap out the cheese for what you have on hand. And if the thought of going off book frightens you, just follow the recipe exactly as written. You can be brave next time.”  Thank you to TASTE for this amorphous, inspiring ode to experimentation, AND to using the whole leek!

  • 3 large leeks

  • 4 tablespoons butter

  • 1 ¼ cup Arborio rice

  • ¼ cup white wine

  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken stock

  • 8 oz shredded Gouda (about 2 cups)

  • 6 Say Hay eggs

  • salt and pepper

Begin by prepping the leeks. Fill a large bowl with cold water. Trim the tops and bottoms from the leeks, and remove any outer leaves that look not so great. Cut in half, and put the whites to the side. Slice the leek greens on a bias into thin ¼" pieces, put them in the bowl of water, and swish them around for a while to make sure any dirt trapped in the leaves gets rinsed away.

Melt butter in a saute pan over medium heat. Use a sieve to remove the floating leek greens from the water, give them a good shake, and throw them in the pan with a hefty pinch of kosher salt. Stir well, then cover and cook for five minutes. While that's going, split the leek whites in half lengthwise, then prep exactly the same way as you did with the greens. When your 5-minute timer is up, throw the whites in the pan, stir, then cover and cook for another five minutes.

Remove the lid from the pan and turn the heat up to high. Continue cooking the leeks until most of their moisture has evaporated, then add the rice. Cook for 2-3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the rice gets a bit toasty, then add the white wine and cook for another minute. Stir in the stock, then cover and reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer for 5-7 minutes, until most of the stock has absorbed but the rice is still very runny.

Stir in ¾ of the shredded gouda and taste for seasoning, adding more salt and pepper to taste. Crack your eggs into a measuring cup with a spout. Working quickly, use a spoon to part sections of the rice, sliding an egg into each divot before it collapses on itself. Once all 6 eggs are in, cover the pan and continue simmering until the rice has absorbed all the stock and is fully cooked through.

Pic of the Week:

Happy Spring from Hazel at 7 mos in 2016! &lt;3

Happy Spring from Hazel at 7 mos in 2016! <3

March 20, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Leeks - To make a leek gratin: Preheat oven to 375°F. Halve 8 medium leeks (white and green parts only) lengthwise, leaving halves attached at root, and rinse well, shaking off water.  In a large skillet, combine 1 ¾ cups heavy cream and leeks; season with coarse salt and ground pepper. Bring to a boil over medium-high; reduce to a medium simmer, cover, and cook 5 minutes. Uncover and simmer until leeks are tender, 15 minutes. Transfer leeks and sauce to a shallow 2-quart baking dish.  Sprinkle with ⅓ cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese and bake until golden and bubbling, about 35 minutes. Let gratin rest 10 minutes before serving.

  • Green Curly Kale - Our favorite in a hearty bean soup!

  • Arugula Flowers - We know you’re familiar with arugula, and you probably remember that once arugula has bolted, the leaves become quite bitter—at that point, they're best suited to being cooked. Though there is an upside to a lack of leaves for your salad: arugula flowers.  After you procure them, use them quickly, as they are extremely perishable. Even a day makes a difference, as they wilt quickly! Embellish everything in sight with your arugula flowers: green salad, pasta, soup. Arugula flowers also pair nicely with eggs. Use them to top a frittata, a quiche, an egg sandwich, go nuts!

  • Celeriac - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Oregano - Oregano tea relaxes nerves and settles an upset stomach.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Celeriac Galette (Serves 4) According to the James Beard Foundation, “this basic savory galette can be adapted for a variety of roots and tubers; simply adjust the quantity of liquid and cooking time based on how fibrous the vegetable is.”  Use two ingredients from this week’s box and get ready to galette!

  • 1 large celeriac (1 lb)

  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter

  • Fine sea salt

  • Freshly ground black pepper

  • 3 tablespoons roughly chopped thyme or oregano, plus more leaves for serving

  • 1/2 cup water

  • Coarse sea salt


Preheat the oven to 400°F. Using a mandoline, slice the celeriac crosswise into 1/16 -inch rounds; place in a medium mixing bowl and set aside.

Heat a 9-inch ovenproof frying pan (I use cast iron) over moderately high heat; add the olive oil and butter, and swirl both around the bottom and sides of the pan.

Pour the warm fat over the sliced celeriac; add a pinch of fine sea salt and a few grinds of black pepper; toss with about 2 tablespoons of the chopped thyme. Place the celeriac in the oiled pan, overlapping the slices to create a tight circular pattern; you will have 2 to 3 layers. Drizzle any remaining fat and herbs on top and add the ½ cup water. Bake until the celeriac can be pierced easily with the tip of a knife, about 45 minutes.

Remove the pan from the oven and transfer to the stove. Sauté over high heat (leaving the celeriac slices undisturbed) until the bottom and edges are golden and crispy, about 8 minutes. Cool for 15 minutes before unmolding.

Use an offset spatula or paring knife to loosen the edges of the galette. Flip the pan onto a serving platter, board, or plate; tap the bottom. Lift the pan; rearrange any celeriac slices that may have fallen out. Sprinkle the galette with coarse sea salt and a bit more black pepper; top with a few leaves of fresh thyme, oregano, or marjoram.

Pic of the Week:

Chickens in an old field of greens

Chickens in an old field of greens

March 13, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Leeks - Once established in the garden, leeks are hardy; many varieties can be left in the ground during the winter to be harvested as needed.

  • Oranges - Oranges are classified into two general categories: sweet and bitter. The sweet varieties are the most commonly consumed. Popular varieties of the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) include Valencia, navel and Jaffa oranges. Bitter oranges (Citrus aurantium) are often used to make jam or marmalade, and their zest is used as the flavoring for liqueurs such as Grand Marnier and Cointreau.

  • Dino Kale Raab - Raab, strange a word as it sounds to American ears, is just taken from the Italian word “rapa,” for turnip, another vegetable in the Brassica genus that bolts and produces these tender little flowers. (Dutch for turnip: raap or knolraap; German for turnip: rybe.)

  • Celeriac - Thinly shaved, a great topping for pizza!

  • Mint - The star of this week’s recipe

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Fettuccine with Asparagus, Leeks, and Mint (Serves 4) Use two ingredients from this week’s box and check this out recipe from the folks at Real Simple: “Spring is the ideal time to make a vegetable pasta: It’s the tail end of winter, when we still want comfort food, but there are delicious, fresh foods back in the market stalls. Enter this vegetarian spring pasta with asparagus, which feels particularly light since it doesn’t have an intense tomato or creamy sauce. Mint adds a bright note to balance the buttery sautéed leeks, while red pepper flakes add heat to cut through each bite. Serve with a dry, medium-bodied white wine or a light beer.”

  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest plus 2 Tbsp. fresh juice (from 1 large lemon)

  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

  • ½ cup olive oil, divided

  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • ½ cup torn fresh mint, divided

  • 10 ounces fettuccine

  • 1 pound thin asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1½-in. pieces

  • 1 large leek, white and light green parts only

  • 1½ ounces Parmesan, shaved (about ½ cup)

  • ⅛ teaspoon crushed red pepper

Whisk lemon zest and juice, salt, ¼ cup oil, and black pepper in a large bowl. Stir in ¼ cup mint.

Cook pasta according to package directions. Add asparagus during the last 3 minutes of cooking. Drain and cover to keep warm.

Meanwhile, halve leek lengthwise and thinly slice crosswise into half-moons (about 2 cups). Place in a medium bowl filled with water and let stand for 1 minute, stirring occasionally. Lift leek slices from water (leaving any grit behind) and drain on paper towels.

Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Cook leeks, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 4 minutes. Add lemon mixture, pasta, and asparagus to skillet with leeks and toss to combine. Serve topped with cheese, crushed red pepper, and remaining ¼ cup mint. Drizzle with remaining 2 tablespoons oil.

Pic of the Week:

throwback tractor shot

throwback tractor shot

March 5, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Leeks - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Oranges - The most important rule of zesting: No matter which type of citrus you’re working with or method you use, there is one universal rule that will always apply: Remove just the thin, colored skin, or zest, of the fruit. Always leave behind the soft, white pith that lies underneath. The pith has a bitter, unappealing taste that you simply don’t want to include.  Removing just the right amount of zest without picking up any of the pith can be tricky, but it gets easier the more times you do it. It depends on the type of tool you’re using, as well as the amount of pressure you apply.

  • Turnip Raab - It’s great simply blanched and sautéed in olive oil, roasted until crisp or even pureed into a piquant pesto.

  • Celeriac - For baked celeriac: Heat oven to 350℉.  Thoroughly wash whole celeriac and pat dry; brush the outside with olive oil, sprinkle liberally with coarse salt and bake for 1 to 2 hours (for celeriac, longer is better; many vegetables will be done sooner), until the outside is roasted and evenly crisp and the inside is tender.  Remove from the oven, cut up if you like (you can also sprinkle with more oil and salt) and serve. (Yes, you can eat the skin.)

  • Parsley - Smash a few pinches into cream cheese for an herbaceous bagel spread.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Leek, Turnip, and Rice Soup (Serves 4) Martha Rose Shulman from The New York Times says, “this simple, fragrant soup is delicious as thick vegetable soup, not puréed. It becomes a different soup altogether when you purée it, and I like both versions equally.”  Fine, you’ve convinced us, I’ll try both.

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • 4 large leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned and sliced

  • 1 pound turnips, cut in 1/2-inch dice

  • 2 garlic cloves, minced

  • 2 quarts vegetable stock, chicken stock or water

  • Salt to taste

  • 1 bay leaf

  • ½ cup rice, preferably arborio

  • Freshly ground pepper

  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

  • Freshly grated Parmesan for serving (optional)

  • Garlic croutons for serving (optional)

Heat the oil over medium heat in a large, heavy soup pot or Dutch oven and add the leeks. Cook, stirring often, until leeks are beginning to soften, about 3 minutes. Add the turnips and continue to cook, stirring often, until the turnips are translucent and the leeks thoroughly tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook, stirring for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the stock or water, salt, bay leaf and rice. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer 30 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings. If serving as is, add pepper, stir in the parsley and serve, over croutons if desired, passing Parmesan at the table for sprinkling.

Tips For a pureed soup, use an immersion blender (or a regular blender, working in batches and placing a kitchen towel over the top to avoid splashing) until the mixture is very smooth. Return to the pot, heat through and adjust salt. Stir in the pepper and parsley and serve, passing Parmesan at the table for sprinkling.

Advance preparation: You can make this a day ahead, but omit the rice. About 30 minutes before serving, bring back to a simmer, add the rice and simmer until tender, 20 to 30 minutes. If you let the soup sit with the rice, it will continue to absorb the broth.

Pic of the Week:

eggstravaganza

eggstravaganza

February 27, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Leeks - For simple yet decadent buttered leeks:  A Scottish favorite, this is one of the best ways to cook leeks – slowly and gently in their own juices.  The day before you want to serve this dish, cut the leeks from top to root and wash thoroughly under cold running water. Thinly slice them on the diagonal and put into plastic bags and chill until ready to cook.  To serve, put a large pan over a medium heat, add butter and let it melt over the base of the pan. Add the leeks and plenty of thyme leaves and stir to coat in the butter. Turn the heat down to low, cover the pan and cook the leeks gently for about 15 minutes, stirring half way through until they are tender. Serve with extra butter and a sprinkling of thyme leaves.

  • Oranges - There are four different kitchen tools that can be used to zest citrus fruits: a microplane, citrus zester, vegetable peeler, or paring knife. The choice about which tool to use is entirely up to you. It all depends on how you plan to use the zest and your personal preference.  For finely grated zest that melts into a pound cake or batch of cookies, a microplane produces the best results. If you’d like a pretty garnish for your cocktail glass, then a citrus zester will give you a little curlicue. On the other hand, if appearance and size don’t matter, a simple paring knife or peeler will get the job done just fine.

  • Kale Raab - “Raabs” – be they kale raab, broccoli raab, or any other kind of raab – are just flowers with a funny name. Raabs are the tender flowering tops of the bolted Brassica genus, i.e., the cabbage family. But more important, these are flowers you can, and should, eat.  When the brassica vegetables bolt after the long winter, the flowers they produce are tender and delicious. TO PREPARE: Simplest is probably also best: saute it in some olive oil, salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy. The thicker, lower parts of the stems may be a bit tougher than the rest; you might chop them into one-inch lengths and blanch (boil for a minute or two) first, to cook them slightly and soften them up before adding them to the blossoms and thinner stems in the saute pan.  While kale raab is fantastic as a simple stir-fry, you could also add it to soups or toss with pasta.  

  • Celeriac - The star of this week’s recipe!

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Celeriac Ribbons Tossed with Chard, Garlic & Pumpkin Seeds (Serves 2) A delicious spin on celeriac, as well as a great dinner idea for two, especially if you’re looking for gluten free options!  Thank you to BBCgoodfood for the dish…

  • 1 small celeriac, peeled then cut into ribbons using a vegetable peeler

  • 1 lemon, juice only

  • ¼ cup pumpkin seeds

  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 tbsp butter

  • 4 thyme sprigs, leaves removed

  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

  • ½ tsp dried chilli flakes

  • 1 bunch chard, stalks sliced and leaves shredded

  • ⅓ cup pecorino or hard vegetarian cheese

  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Using a good vegetable peeler, cut long, wide strips (about the width of pappardelle) around the circumference of the celeriac, into a bowl of water and lemon juice, until you have lots of ribbons. Allow for more than you would if using pasta.

Dry-fry the pumpkin seeds in a pan until they’ve puffed and popped. Set aside.

Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil. Add the celeriac for 1 min, drain and reserve the water. In a non-stick frying pan, heat the oil and butter until the butter has melted and foamed up. Add the thyme, garlic and chilli.

Cook the garlic mixture for 5 mins until fragrant and almost golden, add the chard stalks and stir, cooking for a couple more mins. Add the pumpkin seeds and the chard leaves, season and squeeze in some lemon juice. Turn up the heat and stir in half the grated cheese. Add the celeriac and a slosh of the cooking water and toss, shaking the pan until the sauce looks glossy. Divide between plates, top with more cheese and serve.

Pic of the Week:

oldie but goodie

oldie but goodie

February 20, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Parsley -  To make triple green salad: Whirl 1 cup very roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley leaves plus 1 cup whole leaves, 2 ½ tsp finely chopped fresh thyme, ½ tsp lemon zest and 2 tbsp lemon juice, ¼ c extra virgin olive oil, ½ tsp Kosher salt, and ½ tsp pepper in a blender with 1 tbsp. water until very smooth, 1 to 2 minutes.  Toss parsley leaves, 3 green onions (thinly cut on the diagonal), and 4 oz baby greens in a large bowl with just enough dressing to coat; reserve any remaining dressing for another use.

  • Oranges - Orange zest is made from the top layer of an orange's peel. It contains the fruit's oils and adds a bright, citrus flavor to a dish or recipe. There are several kitchen utensils you can use to zest an orange, including a grater, microplane, vegetable peeler, or knife. Before you zest an orange, be sure to wash the fruit thoroughly with water and a drop of dish soap, and scrub the skin with your fingers or a brush!

  • Dino Kale - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Scarlet Queen Turnips - Many folks who don’t like turnips do like mashed turnips with potatoes, in which chunks of peeled potato and turnips are cooked together until both are tender. Milk, salt and pepper go in as the drained vegetables are mashed. A small amount of sugar is often added to help smooth out any rough flavour edges, but when working with garden-grown turnips that mature in cool soil, taste before adding sugar. Or here’s another idea: add a finely chopped apple to the hot drained vegetables along with a pinch of cinnamon. The subtle sweetness of the apple works surprisingly well marrying the flavours and textures of turnips and potatoes.

  • Celeriac - Great in a breakfast hash!

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Hazelnut and Celeriac Soup with Kale, Parsley, and Olive Oil (Serves 4) Straight from Gill Meller of the River Cottage Kitchen empire across the pond, this gorgeous soup will warm your heart and body during our latest cold snap.

  • 4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling

  • 14oz celeriac, peeled and cut into 3⁄4-inch cubes

  • 1 onion, finely diced

  • 3 or 4 thyme sprigs

  • 1 ¾ oz shelled hazelnuts, roughly chopped

  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and grated, plus an extra clove, halved, for rubbing

  • 4–6 sage leaves, torn

  • 1 liter good-quality, chicken or vegetable stock

  • 1 small bunch dino kale, tough stem removed, leaves roughly chopped

  • 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

  • toasted or chargrilled bread, for serving

Heat the olive oil in a large heavy-based pan over a medium heat. Add the celeriac, diced onion and thyme sprigs. Cook, stirring regularly, for 5–6 minutes, until the onion is soft but not coloured, then season the celeriac with salt and pepper. Scatter over the chopped nuts, the grated garlic, and the torn sage leaves and stir well. Cook for 1–2 minutes more, then add the stock and bring the contents of the pan up to a simmer.

Cook gently for 8–10 minutes until the celeriac is tender, then add the chopped kale and return to a simmer. Cook for a further 10 minutes, until the kale is tender, then remove the soup from the heat. Add the chopped parsley to the pan, then season well with salt and pepper.

Ladle the soup into bowls and serve with some toasted or chargrilled bread rubbed with a halved garlic clove and sprinkled with flaky salt, then drizzled with your best olive oil.

Pic of the Week:

Farmer Fred

Farmer Fred

February 13, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Arugula Rabe - Delicious as a braising green!

  • Oranges- All citrus trees belong to the single genus Citrus and remain almost entirely interfertile, meaning they are capable of interbreeding. This includes grapefruits, lemons, limes, oranges, and various other types and hybrids. As the interfertility of oranges and other citrus has produced numerous hybrids and cultivars, and bud mutations have also been selected, citrus taxonomy is fairly controversial, confusing or inconsistent.  Maybe we should just eat and enjoy them all!

  • Dino Kale - For kale lemonade: Pass 2 lbs kale (with stems, chopped), 2 apples (such as Honeycrisp, chopped - with peels and cores), and 1 lemon (chopped - with rind and pith) through a juicer. Stir to combine; serve.

  • Leeks - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Celeriac - Storage: Since celery root is a root vegetable, it stores well and for a long time if it is kept cool. Having spent most of its life underground, it also enjoys the dark. Kept loosely wrapped in plastic in the fridge it will last up to several weeks—even longer if it was freshly harvested. Don't peel celery root to store it—the peeled vegetables will oxidize and turn brown. Don't wash it either. If it has dirt clinging to the peel (it often does) brush off what you can, then store the root loosely wrapped in plastic to keep the dirt contained. As with all root vegetables, bits of dirt clinging to it will actually help the celery root stay fresh longer.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Caramelized Leek and Fava Bean Toast (Serves 4) Move over avocado toast from your 2018 brunch pedestal… A new spread is coming to town!  From the amazing female chef duo at LA’s Botanica, via Bon Appetit, this lovely bfast combo is sure to feature heavily in your morning rotation!

Caramelized Leeks

  • 4 leeks, white and light green parts only, sliced in half lengthwise, rinsed well

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

  • Kosher salt

  • 2 tsp. very finely chopped rosemary leaves

  • 1 tsp. Aleppo-style pepper

  • 1 tsp. finely grated lemon zest

  • 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice

Tartine Assembly

  • 2 cups shelled fava beans (from about 2 lb. pods), shelled fresh peas (from about 2 lb. pods), or one 10-oz. package frozen peas, thawed

  • 2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice

  • 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling

  • Kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper

  • 4 thick slices whole grain sourdough bread, toasted

  • 1 garlic clove

  • Aleppo-style pepper, finely grated lemon zest, and sliced chives (for serving)

Caramelized Leeks

Slice leeks crosswise into 3" pieces, then lengthwise into thin matchsticks. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium. Add leeks; season with a pinch of salt. Cook, covered, stirring and tossing occasionally (and reducing heat if needed to avoid getting color on leeks at this point), until leeks are soft, 8–10 minutes. Add rosemary, Aleppo-style pepper, and lemon zest. Continue to cook, stirring often, until leeks are golden brown and caramelized, 5–10 minutes longer. Remove from heat and stir in lemon juice; season with salt.

Tartine Assembly

Toss beans with lemon juice and 2 Tbsp. oil in a medium bowl; season with salt and black pepper.

Drizzle toasts with oil and rub with garlic clove. Top toasts with a dollop of caramelized leeks and a big spoonful of dressed beans. Season with Aleppo-style pepper, then sprinkle lemon zest and chives over.

Pic of the Week:

Green Wave

Green Wave

February 6, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Arugula Rabe- The flower buds of brassicas from the turnip family are often referred to as rabe, or raab, derived from raps, which means turnip in Italian. This time of the year, you will find the rabes of many types of brassicas in the market—kale, mustard greens, Brussels sprouts, turnips, bok choy and Chinese cabbage.  While each of these are from a common family there are slight differences in taste between them. With each, you are meant to eat the stems, buds and leaves, making them very easy to prep for cooking. Don’t be alarmed if the buds have begun to show their yellow flowers. Some feel that the flowers are a sweeter version of the parent plant.  All of the aforementioned brassicas are excellent roasted, sautéed or lightly steamed. We don’t recommend boiling because it is easy to overcook the leaves in boiling water. The usual additions of garlic and a pinch of red pepper flakes makes for an easy and delicious preparation. Finish your dish with salt and pepper to taste and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

  • Celeriac - Refrigerate whole celeriac in a plastic bag for up to a week.  Before using celery root, peel and soak it briefly in water with a little vinegar or lemon juice to prevent cut surfaces from darkening.

  • Dino Kale - Unlike more tender greens, dino kale doesn't store better if washed first so you can put off that task until you're ready to use it.

  • Scarlet Queen Turnips -Try them grated with apple, parsley, oil, and vinegar, for a crunchy, bright winter salad.

  • Leeks - The star of this week’s recipe!

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Split Pea Soup (Serves 6)  Get through these wild rainy days we’re having with this classic... Deb from Smitten Kitchen says,I make a quick and hasty herb sauce by blending 1 large or 2 small, peeled garlic clove(s) and a couple handfuls of fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves (or a mix of herbs, such as mint and/or cilantro, that you’d like here) with the finely grated zest of half a lemon, salt, and red pepper flakes until well chopped and then drizzling in olive oil with the machine running until the mixture becomes saucy. Season with more salt and pepper. This sauce keeps in the fridge for a week and is also great on roasted potatoes, squash or even fried eggs.”

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter

  • 3 leeks, halved and sliced into ribbons

  • 1 carrot, chopped small

  • 1 large rib celery, chopped

  • Salt and freshly black pepper

  • 4 cloves garlic, cloves peeled and sliced thin

  • 1 pound dried green split peas, rinsed and picked over

  • 2 quarts vegetable stock or broth.

  • 2 to 3 sprigs of thyme, leaves still on (optional)

  • 1 bay leaf

To finish

  • Fresh herb sauce (instructions up top)

  • Sour cream

  • Two slices of crumbled crisp bacon (obviously would no longer be vegetarian)

  • Garlicky or gruyere croutons

On the stove: Heat a 4 to 5-quart heavy pot over medium. Add oil, or oil and butter, and once warm, add leeks, carrots and celery. Season with salt and pepper and cook until softened and beginning to get slightly brown at edges, about 10 minutes. Add garlic and cook two minutes more. Add the dried peas and stir to coat with the vegetables, then add the vegetable stock or broth, thyme, if using, and bay leaf. Increase the heat to bring the mixture to a simmer, then reduce to a low simmer and cook, partially covered, until peas have softened, 50 to 60 minutes. Remove thyme sprigs (most of the leaves will have fallen off) and bay leaf and season very well with salt and black pepper.

In an InstantPot or electric pressure cooker: Set your pot to sauté and cook the vegetables as written above. Once you’ve added the stock, dried peas, and herbs, cook the mixture under high pressure for 15 minutes and then let it naturally release for at least 5 minutes manually releasing it the rest of the way. Remove thyme sprigs (most of the leaves will have fallen off) and bay leaf and season very well with salt and black pepper.

Both methods: I do not puree this soup, but you can at this point with an immersion blender, either all or just halfway. Ladle soup into bowls and finish with garnishes of your choice.

Do ahead: Split pea soup keeps fantastically in the fridge or freezer but, just to warn you, it looks crazy thick once it has chilled. It should loosen as you rewarm it, but if it doesn’t enough to your liking, add another splash of broth or water as needed.

Pic of the Week:

Winter Wonderland

Winter Wonderland

January 30, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Oranges - Oranges thrive best where the trees are chilled somewhat by occasional light frosts in winter. The trees are semi-dormant at that season, and temperatures just below freezing will not harm trees or fruit unless frost occurs early, before the trees have finished their annual growth.

  • Celeriac - Try it raw - Although cooked celery root is excellent in soups, stew, and other hot dishes, it can also be enjoyed raw, especially grated and tossed in salads. Raw celery root has an intense flavor that tends to dominate salads, so pair it with other strongly flavored fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, beets, and apples.

  • Dino Kale - The leaves are so sturdy that you don't need to be nearly as careful to avoid bruising and crushing as with other greens. There's no need to beat them up, but also no need to treat them tenderly. One of the advantages of this hearty green is its ability to take a bit of handling without damaging results.

  • Scarlet Queen Turnips - Dice these up and throw ‘em in your next big root roast - yum :)

  • Leeks - The star of this week’s recipe!

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Celeriac, Potato, Leek, and Apple Soup (Makes 8 bowls)  This sweet and savory mixture of ingredients include two items from this week’s box!  Warm up with this lovely wintertime soup from The New York Times.

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 medium onion, chopped

  • 2 leeks, white and light green part only, halved lengthwise, cleaned and sliced or chopped

  • Salt to taste

  • 2 pounds celeriac, peeled and diced (retain tops for bouquet garni and garnish)

  • 1 large russet potato (about 3/4 pound), peeled and diced

  • 2 granny smith or braeburn apples, cored, peeled and diced

  • 2 quarts water, chicken stock, or vegetable stock

  • A bouquet garni made with a bay leaf and a couple of sprigs each thyme and parsley, and a stem or two of the celery from the celery root, if still attached

  • Freshly ground pepper to taste

  • Slivered celery leaves for garnish

Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy soup pot over medium heat and add the onion, leeks and a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes. Add the celeriac and a generous pinch of salt, cover partially and cook for another 5 minutes, stirring often, until the celeriac has begun to soften. Add the potatoes, apples, water or stock, salt to taste, and the bouquet garni. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer 1 hour, or until the vegetables are very tender and the soup is fragrant. Remove and discard the bouquet garni.

Blend the soup in batches in a blender (cover the top with a towel and hold it down to avoid hot splashes), or through a food mill fitted with the fine blade. The soup should be very smooth. Strain if desired. Return to the pot. Stir and taste. Adjust salt, add freshly ground pepper, and heat through. Serve in small bowls or espresso cups, garnished with thin slivers of celery leaves.

Advance preparation: You can make this a day or two ahead and reheat. The soup can be frozen, but you will need to blend it again when you thaw it.

Pic of the Week:

Lovely staff and winter veg at market

Lovely staff and winter veg at market

January 23, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Oranges - Oranges can be stored at room temperature for several days or in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

  • Cilantro - The plant is native to regions spanning from southern Europe and northern Africa to southwestern Asia, which helps explains its presence in so many different cuisines.

  • Dino Kale - This type of kale is particularly well suited to braising in a bit of broth—simply heat a pan, add a little bit of broth, add the cleaned and chopped kale, cover, and cook over gentle heat until the leaves are wilted and tender.

  • Scarlet Queen Turnips - The start of this week’s recipe!

  • Leeks - Fresh leeks should be stored unwashed and untrimmed in the refrigerator, where they will keep fresh for between one and two weeks. Wrapping them loosely in a plastic bag will help them to retain moisture.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Shaved Turnip Salad with Arugula and Prosciutto (Serves 4)  This is a simple yet elegant dish that tastes amazing!  Thank you to The New York Times for the recipe!

  • 4 teaspoons red wine vinegar

  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt

  • 2 teaspoons honey

  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

  • Pepper

  • 4 small turnips, about 5 ounces, peeled

  • 8 cups arugula, wild if possible

  • 4 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces

In a small bowl, whisk the vinegar and salt until the salt dissolves. Whisk in the honey, oil and pepper.

Using a mandoline or sharp knife, slice the turnips into paper-thin rounds. In a large bowl, combine turnips, arugula and prosciutto. Toss with the dressing. Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary.

Pic of the Week:

EGGSTRAVAGANZA

EGGSTRAVAGANZA

January 16, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Oranges - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Arugula - Add arugula to your next bunch of risotto for that lovely kick...

  • Curly Kale - Kale has more vitamin C than any other leafy green!

  • Scarlet Queen Turnips - Cook cut-up turnips and sliced garlic in olive oil in a large skillet until tender. Add the turnip greens and cook until just wilted. Season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Mixed Citrus and Arugula Salad (Serves 4)  Use two ingredients from this week’s box to add a wonderful burst of color and flavor to your day amidst the rain and gloom we have been experiencing.  Thanks to Food & Wine for the recipe!

  • 2 navel oranges

  • 2 tangerines

  • 3 clementines

  • 1 large shallot, sliced paper-thin

  • 3 tablespoons chopped mint leaves

  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

  • 1 tablespoon walnut oil (or use another oil like corn, canola, safflower, or peanut)

  • 1 tablespoon crème fraîche or sour cream

  • 2 bunches of arugula (1/4 lb each), tough stems discarded

  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Using a sharp knife, peel the oranges, tangerines and clementines, removing all the bitter white pith. Slice the clementines crosswise 1/2 inch thick and remove the pits. Transfer the clementines to a medium bowl. Working over the bowl, cut between the membranes of the oranges and tangerines, releasing the sections into the bowl. Add the shallot and mint.

In a large bowl, whisk the lime juice with the walnut oil and crème fraîche. Add the arugula, season with salt and pepper and toss gently. Using tongs, transfer the arugula to plates. Add the citrus fruits to the remaining dressing, season with salt and pepper and toss to coat. Top the arugula with the citrus and serve.

Pic of the Week:

market spread

market spread

January 9, 2019

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Celeriac - Many people view its crude, rough exterior with suspicion and may never give it a try, which makes celeriac a truly underrated vegetable.  However, once the peel is removed, you’ll find flesh that’s nutty, sweet, and full of a delicate celery flavor. And like other winter-root vegetables, celeriac is hearty and versatile, and can be prepared in so many different ways.  It can be boiled, braised, steamed, roasted, or eaten raw. Potatoes take on a new character when boiled and mashed with celeriac. It’s delicious simmered in soups and stews, or baked in gratins. And it’s wonderful roasted with meats, or shredded for salads and slaws.  

  • Oranges - Why do oranges wear suntan lotion? Because they tend to peel.

  • Leeks - A great addition to any frittata!

  • Arugula - A blend of chiles, arugula, mint, and lime, this herby lime dressing brightens up everything from salads and grains to fish and meat! Purée 1 chopped serrano or jalapeno chile (seeds removed; optional), ½ c packed arugula, ½ c packed fresh mint leaves, ½ c vegetable oil, ¼ c olive oil, ½ tsp finely grated lime zest,  ¼ c fresh lime juice, and ½ tsp sugar in a blender until smooth; season with Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper. Yum!

  • Dino Kale - If you find that kale has a bit more of a bitter edge than you care for, try blanching it before using it in the recipes above. Blanching is simply quickly cooking a fruit or vegetable in salted boiling water. For dino kale, put whole or chopped leaves in salted boiling water for about 1 minute, drain, rinse with cold water to cool off, and use your hands to squeeze as much water out of it as possible. This process will leech out much of the bitterness.

  • Parsley - The star of this week’s recipe!

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Chopped Herb Salad with Farro (Serves 6)  Based on a Middle Eastern tabbouleh, this dish puts an interesting spin on the old favorite by using farro instead of bulgur..  And, it’s easy to throw together! You can use other herbs like dill or basil if you’d like. Thanks to The New York Times for the recipe.

  • 2 cups chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley (from 2 large bunches)

  • ¼ cup chopped fresh mint

  • 1 cup chopped arugula or a mix of arugula and other herbs

  • ¾ pound (2 large) ripe tomatoes, very finely chopped

  • 1 bunch scallions, finely chopped

  • 1 cup cooked farro or spelt

  • 1 teaspoon ground sumac

  • Juice of 1 to 2 large lemons, to taste

  • Salt to taste

  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

  • Small leaves from 1 romaine lettuce heart, leaves separated, washed and dried (optional)

In a large bowl, combine parsley, mint, arugula and/or other herbs, tomatoes, scallions, farro, sumac, lemon juice and salt to taste. Refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours so the farro marinates in the lemon juice.

Add olive oil, toss together, taste and adjust seasonings. The salad should taste lemony. Add more lemon juice if it doesn’t. Serve with lettuce leaves if desired.

Pic of the Week:

Happy 2019! Winter Market from Say Hay! &lt;3

Happy 2019! Winter Market from Say Hay! <3

December 19, 2018

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Celeriac - Many soups and stews start out with a base of onions, garlic, and other aromatics, called a mire poix. In French cooking, it’s typically onion, celery, and carrot. Cajun is the holy trinity of onion, pepper, and carrot. Try onion, carrot, and the celery root as your next soup base!

  • Hot Peppers - The substances that give chili peppers their pungency (spicy heat) when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin and several related chemicals, collectively called capsaicinoids.  When peppers are consumed by mammals such as humans, capsaicin binds with pain receptors in the mouth and throat, potentially evoking pain via spinal relays to the brainstem and thalamus where heat and discomfort are perceived.

  • Onions - For a creamed onion gratin: Heat oven to 350°F. Toss 2 medium yellow onions (cored and quartered lengthwise) with ¼ c olive oil in a 9″ × 11″ baking dish and season with Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Bake, stirring occasionally, until soft and lightly browned, about 1 hour; set aside. Heat oven to broil. Heat 2 tbsp unsalted butter in a 2-qt. saucepan over medium-high heat; add 2 tbsp flour, and cook, stirring, until smooth, about 1 minute. Add 1 c heavy cream and ¼ c dry white wine, and cook, stirring, until thickened, about 5 minutes. Season sauce with salt, pepper, and freshly grated nutmeg (to taste).  Pour sauce evenly over onions. Sprinkle with ½ c finely grated parmesan, dot with 3 oz crumbled Gorgonzola, and sprinkle with ¼ tsp paprika; broil until cheese is melted and golden brown on top, about 2 minutes.

  • Sweet Potatoes - Just as you can make “noodles” from spiralized zucchini, you can use the same method to create sweet potato “noodles.” It’s not necessary to cook the noodles before topping them with your favorite pasta fixings, though you can stir-fry them if you choose.

  • Dino Kale - The start of this week’s recipe!

  • Parsley - Treat it like a seasoning—baked into meatballs, chopped into starches, or kneaded into bread dough—or even as a vegetable snipped into sandwiches, deep-fried and salted as a side dish, or dressed like salad leaves and mixed with toppings like fennel, nuts and seeds or tomatoes.  Long cooking times tend to dilute leaf flavor, though, so if you're adding fresh leaves to hot food, be sure to do it at the very end. And skip the dried version for most purposes. It tastes overly grassy and hay-like—not much like the fresh flavor at all.

  • Tokyo Turnips - Just like many root vegetables, these turnips are incredibly versatile. You can slice them into thin disc and toss in fresh salads, or add them to soups, or steam or roast them with other vegetables/meat, or add them into stir-fries. In Japan, Tokyo turnips are commonly enjoyed in pickles and in miso soup. With their mild and juicy flavor, they make a delicious side dish to meat dishes like roast fish and savory grilled meat or with any vegetarian meal. Same goes with the turnip greens, you can literally enjoy them in endless preparations just like any greens. They are tender, sweet, a little spicy and delicious!  To retain the crisp texture, you want to avoid overcooking both the roots and the greens.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Bean and Grain Stew with Garlic and Chiles (Serves 4)  Warm and hearty, let this incredible stew get you through the holiday season and into the new year!  Thank you to Bon Appetit for the recipe!

  • 1 medium onion, peeled, halved

  • 2 cups soldier, cranberry, or pinto beans, soaked overnight, drained

  • Kosher salt

  • 1 cup any combination black barley, whole hull-less barley, rye berries, wheat berries, and/or other whole grains

  • 4 cups coarsely torn whole wheat sourdough bread

  • ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided

  • 1 red chile, such as Fresno, sliced

  • 2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar

  • 1 head of garlic, peeled, separated into cloves, sliced

  • 5 ounces maitake or other mushrooms, torn into bite-size pieces

  • 1 small bunch of Dino kale, center ribs and stems removed, torn into large pieces

  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

  • Freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 tablespoon (or more) fresh lemon juice

  • 2 tablespoons sliced chives

Heat a medium skillet, preferably cast iron, over medium-high until very hot. Carefully lay a piece of foil inside skillet, followed by onion, cut sides down. Char onion until totally blackened on cut sides, about 15 minutes. Wipe out skillet and reserve.

Transfer onion to a small pot. Add beans and enough water to cover them by about 2". Give everything a stir and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat and simmer, skimming off any foam and adding water if needed to keep beans submerged, until beans are tender, 1½–2 hours. Season with salt. Ideally, they should cool overnight in their cooking liquid, but they’ll still be awesome if you can’t hit pause at this point.

Meanwhile, cook grains in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente, 50–70 minutes. Let cool in their liquid—ideally overnight, but same story as with the beans.

Preheat oven to 300°F. Toss bread with ¼ cup oil on a large rimmed baking sheet. Season with salt. Squeeze and toss bread to absorb as much oil as possible. Bake until croutons are well-browned and very crisp, 35–45 minutes.

Meanwhile, combine chile and rice vinegar in a small bowl. Soak until ready to use.

Bring garlic and ½ cup oil to a simmer in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook, lowering heat as needed to maintain a gentle simmer and swirling occasionally, until garlic is golden brown, 12–14 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer garlic chips to paper towels. Reserve garlic oil.

Heat remaining 2 Tbsp. olive oil in reserved medium skillet over medium-high. Add mushrooms and cook, undisturbed, until browned underneath, about 2 minutes. Toss and continue to cook, tossing occasionally and adding kale a few pieces at a time, until mushrooms are browned and crisp and kale is just wilted, 5–6 minutes. Season with salt; transfer to a plate.

Transfer 2 cups grains (including some of their liquid) to a medium bowl; wipe out pot. Return grains and their liquid to pot. Add 4 cups cooked beans (including some of their liquid; discard onion). Bring to a simmer. Add red wine vinegar and ⅓ cup garlic oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Just before serving, chop half of mushrooms and kale and fold into stew. Add lemon juice, half of croutons, and half of garlic chips. Taste and add more lemon juice, if needed.

Divide stew among bowls and top with remaining mushrooms, kale, croutons, and garlic chips. Top with chives and drained chile slices. Drizzle with remaining garlic oil as desired.

Do Ahead: Beans and grains can be cooked 1 day ahead; let cool in their cooking liquid.



Pic of the Week:

Kalevision

Kalevision

December 12, 2018

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Cabbage - Make caraway cabbage chips with dill yogurt!  Preheat oven to 200°F. Divide 8 innermost cabbage leaves (ribs removed, leaves cut into quarters) between 2 wire racks set inside rimmed baking sheets. Brush with olive oil; sprinkle with toasted caraway seeds and season with Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Bake until crisp, 2–2½ hours. Mix together 1 finely grated garlic clove, 1 c plain yogurt, 2 tbsp chopped fresh dill, and1 tbsp fresh lemon juice; season with salt and pepper. Serve with chips.

  • Hungarian Wax Hot Peppers - This pepper is usually harvested before maturity when still yellow. It measures between 4"-6" inches in length (10-15cm) which tapers to a rounded point. Upon maturity, the pepper becomes orange then red in color. Although similar in appearance to banana peppers when immature, it is a different cultivar.

  • Leeks - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Sweet Potatoes - According to sweet potato experts including the North Carolina Sweet Potato Commission, refrigerating sweet potatoes is a no-no. Your refrigerator is actually too cool, and can change the cell structure of the potatoes, making them hard in the center with white spots. Refrigeration can diminish the flavor of sweet potatoes as well. Ventilation is another key to properly storing sweet potatoes—another strike against the crisper drawer.  Instead, keep your sweet potatoes in a basket in a kitchen cabinet or basement. This is the best way to store them for longer lengths of time. If sweet potatoes don’t last very long in your house, you can also do as I do, and place them in a bowl in a cool spot on your kitchen counter, away from windows.

  • Baby Kale - Baby kale are the delicate leaves of the young immature kale plant. Their flavor is milder than that of traditional kale and has a slightly peppery flavor, similar to that of arugula. Though still hardier than most lettuce varieties the small leaves of Baby kale are much more delicate than mature kale.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Potato-Leek Soup with Toasted Nuts and Seeds (Serves 6)  This yummy soup is great for the chilly, sometimes rainy weather.  To attain a beautiful cream-white color (versus more of a beige), don’t let the leeks and celery take on any color when sauteeing.  Thank you to Bon Appetit for the recipe!

  • 3 large leeks

  • 4 sprigs thyme

  • 2 sprigs rosemary

  • 2 bay leaves

  • ¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter

  • 3 celery stalks, chopped

  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

  • 1 russet potato, peeled, chopped

  • 5 cups (or more) low-sodium chicken broth

  • ½ cup heavy cream

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

  • ¼ cup almonds, chopped

  • 2 tablespoons raw sunflower seeds

  • 1 tablespoon coriander seeds, crushed

  • Pinch of sugar

  • ¼ cup crème fraîche

Trim dark green leaves from leeks; discard all but 2. Tuck thyme, rosemary, and bay leaves inside leek leaves; tie closed with kitchen twine. Thinly slice light and pale-green parts of leeks.

Heat butter in a large heavy pot over medium-high. Add celery and sliced leeks and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until leeks begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low, add herb bundle, cover pot, and cook, checking and stirring occasionally, until leeks and celery are very soft, 25–30 minutes (this long, slow cooking draws maximum flavor out of the vegetables). Increase heat to medium-high, add potato and 5 cups broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until potato is very tender, 10–15 minutes. Let cool slightly. Discard herb bundle and any herbs that may have fallen out while cooking.

Working in batches, purée leek mixture in a blender until very smooth (make sure lid is slightly ajar to let steam escape; cover with a towel). Transfer to a large bowl or pitcher.

Pour soup back into pot and add cream. Thin with broth, if needed. Taste and season with salt and pepper; keep warm.

Heat oil in a small skillet over medium. Add almonds, sunflower seeds, and coriander seeds and sprinkle sugar over; cook, stirring, until nuts and seeds are golden, about 4 minutes.  Transfer nuts to paper towels to drain; season with salt and pepper.

Serve soup topped with crème fraîche and nut mixture.

Do ahead: Soup and nut mixture can be made 4 days ahead. Let soup cool; cover and chill. Store nut mixture airtight at room temperature.



Pic of the Week:

Arugula, up close and personal

Arugula, up close and personal

December 5, 2018

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Arugula - For arugula and broccoli salad: Cook 2 heads of broccoli (florets separated, stems peeled and reserved) in a large pot of boiling salted water until bright green and crisp-tender, about 2 minutes. Drain; transfer to a bowl of ice water. Let cool, then drain. Pat broccoli dry; place in a large bowl.  Prepare a grill for medium-high heat. Drizzle broccoli with 3 tbsp oil and toss to coat; season with salt. Grill broccoli, turning occasionally, until charred in spots, 5–7 minutes. Return to bowl and let cool, tossing occasionally. Purée 1 oil-packed anchovy filet, 1 garlic clove, ⅔ c mayonnaise, ¼ c buttermilk, 1 c chervil with tender sprigs, 1 c tarragon leaves, ¼ c chopped chives, 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice, and 1 ½ tsp Dijon mustard in a blender until smooth; season dressing with Kosher salt.  Add 3 c torn arugula leaves to broccoli and toss to combine. Drizzle salad with ¾ cup dressing and toss to coat; season with more salt if needed. Arrange salad on a platter and top with 3 ½ oz grated, smoked cheddar. Do Ahead: Dressing can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill.

  • Hot Peppers - How do you know how heavy a red hot chili pepper is?  Give it a weigh, give a weigh, give it a weigh now...

  • Celeriac - To prepare: Using a sharp knife, top and tail the celeriac, then use a potato peeler to remove the rhino-tough skin. Expect to discard about a quarter of the celeriac by the time you've done this.Store it in the salad drawer of your fridge before use. Celeriac discolours quickly, immerse in a bowl of water, after chopping to size, with a squeeze of lemon juice or a splash of white wine vinegar added (also known as 'acidulated water').

  • Spring Onions - The green tops can be used like chives, as a garnish or sliced in salads or stir fries.  

  • Sweet Potatoes- The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Parsley - Snip off the bases of the stems and remove any discolored or wilted leaves. Transfer them to a large Mason jar with an inch of water in the bottom. Seal the jar with the lid (if it fits), or cover the top of the jar with an overturned plastic bag sealed with a rubber band. Store in the refrigerator.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Miso Sweet Potato and Broccoli Bowl (Serves 4)  My mouth is watering just looking at the recipe!  Thank you to Deb from Smitten Kitchen for this simple yet tasty grain bowl idea and a dressing that can go with pretty much anything.

For the bowl

  • 1 cup dried rice or another cooking grain of your choice

  • 1 to 2 sweet potatoes (about 1.5 pounds)

  • 1 large bundle broccoli (about 1 pound)

  • 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil

  • Coarse or kosher salt

  • Freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 teaspoon white sesame seeds

  • 1 teaspoon black sesame seeds

For the miso-sesame dressing

  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

  • 1 small garlic clove, minced

  • 2 tablespoons white miso (the mildest kind)

  • 2 tablespoons tahini (other nut butters can work in a pinch)

  • 1 tablespoon honey

  • 1/4 cup rice vinegar

  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Heat oven to 400℉. Place rice or grain and cooking liquid in a rice cooker or on the stove. Cook according to package directions.

Peel sweet potatoes and cut into 1-inch cubes. Cut tops off broccoli and separate into bite-sized florets. If your broccoli stems feel especially woody, I like to peel them (with the same vegetable peeler), then cut them into 1/2- to 1-inch segments.

Coat one large or two smaller trays with a thin slick of olive oil. Layer sweet potatoes on tray(s) and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 20 minutes, until browning underneath. Flip and toss chunks around, then add broccoli to the tray(s), season again with salt and pepper, and roast for another 10 to 20 minutes, until broccoli is lightly charred at edges and sweet potato is fully bronzed and tender. Toss chunks around one more time if it looks like they’re cooking unevenly.

In a small skillet, toast black and white sesame seeds until fragrant. (You can do this in the oven if using an oven-proof skillet.) Let cool.

While vegetables roast, prepare sesame-miso dressing: Combine everything in a blender and run until smooth, scraping down sides once. Taste and adjust ingredients if needed, but try to resist adding more honey if it tastes salty, as that extra pop of saltiness is exactly what I think sweet potato needs.

Assemble bowls: Scoop some rice/grains into each, then pile on the roasted sweet potatoes and broccoli. Coat lightly with sesame-miso dressing and finish with toasted sesame seed duo. Serve with extra dressing on the side.

Pic of the Week:

Greens For All

Greens For All

November 28, 2018

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Arugula - For a simple arugula salad, whisk 2 tbsp olive oil, 2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice, ⅛ tsp Kosher salt, and a few grinds of black pepper together in a large bowl. Add 5 oz arugula and toss to combine. Top with 2 oz shaved Parmesan and serve immediately.

  • Hot Peppers - It is at the point where the seed is attached to the white membrane inside the pepper that the highest concentration of capsaicin (the compound giving peppers their pungent flavor) is found. Capsaicin, which makes hot peppers “hot” to the human mouth, is best neutralized by casein, the main protein found in milk.

  • Celeriac - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Mixed Eggplant - Make a charred eggplant dip: Broil 1 small eggplants (prick before cooking) on a rimmed baking sheet, turning occasionally, until soft and charred, about 20 minutes. When cool, remove skin and stems and mash flesh.  Stir in 1 clove minced garlic and 1-2 tsbp fresh lemon juice and season with coarse salt and a pinch of red pepper flakes. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and serve with vegetables like radishes, wax beans, or carrots for dipping.  This smoky dip's flavors get stronger -- and better -- when it sits in the fridge for a couple of days. Try keeping it on hand to serve when friends drop by, or to add it to sandwiches.

  • Sweet Peppers - Grilled or roasted peppers pair beautifully with many polenta dishes.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Celeriac and Lentils with Hazelnut and Mint (Serves 4)  The irrepressible chef Yotam Ottolenghi strikes again with this delicious autumnal/winter recipe… Serve this hearty main course warm or cold, instructions below.  A unique combination of ingredients and flavors!

  • cup whole hazelnuts (skin on)

  • 1 cup French green or Puy lentils

  • 3 cups water

  • 2 bay leaves

  • 4 thyme sprigs

  • 1 small celeriac, peeled and diced

  • 4 tbsp olive oil

  • 3 tbsp hazelnut oil

  • 3 tbsp good-quality red wine vinegar

  • 4 tbsp chopped mint

  • salt and black pepper

Preheat the oven to 275°F.  Scatter the hazelnuts on a small baking sheet and roast in the oven for 15 minutes. Let them cool down, then chop roughly.

Combine the lentils, water, bay leaves and thyme in a small saucepan. Bring to the boil, then simmer for 15–20 minutes, or until al dente. Drain in a sieve.

Meanwhile, in a separate saucepan, cook the celeriac in plenty of boiling salted water for 8–12 minutes, or until just tender. Drain.

In a large bowl mix the hot lentils (if they have cooled down they won’t soak up all the flavors) with the olive oil, 2 tablespoons of the hazelnut oil, the vinegar, some black pepper and plenty of salt. Add the celeriac and stir well. Taste and adjust the seasoning.

To serve straight away, stir in half the mint and half the hazelnuts. Pile onto a serving dish or in a bowl and drizzle the remaining hazelnut oil on top. Garnish with the rest of the mint and hazelnuts.

To serve cold, wait for the lentils and celeriac to cool down before finally adjusting the seasoning and possibly adding some more vinegar, if you like. Add hazelnut oil, mint and nuts in the same way as when serving hot.


Pic of the Week:

Ravishing Radishes!

Ravishing Radishes!

November 21, 2018

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Kale - Spice up that kale, chickpea, and bulgur grain bowl with some silky avocado dressing!  Process ½ avocado (peeled and pitted), 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice, 1 tbsp water, 1 tbsp well-stirred tahini, 1 garlic clove, ¼ tsp ground turmeric, and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a food processor until smooth.

  • Red Fresno Hot Peppers - It looks like a jalapeño and even tastes like a jalapeño, but the Fresno pepper has a few tricks up its sleeve that make it a very popular chili in its own right. It delivers a slightly spicier kick, like a mild serrano chili, and in its mature red form, the Fresno pepper has a fruitier, smokier taste.  So how do you tell the difference between a jalapeño and a Fresno pepper?  Not easily. These two chilies are in fact often confused for each other. They both share similar size traits – two to three inches long, slightly curved, and smooth skin. They both mature from green to a fiery red. As green chilies, they even share very similar tastes. It’s easy to see why even supermarkets mislabel Fresno peppers as jalapeños.  Where the difference lie are the thickness of the walls, the taste as a mature red chili, and the overall heat. In terms of using them, any recipe that calls for a jalapeño or serrano pepper is fair game for a Fresno pepper. They are terrific in salsas, hot sauces, and ceviche, and they stuff decently well too. Pickled Fresno chilies are loved by many, and cutting them fresh into rings for sandwiches and burgers (like the jalapeño) is very popular too.

  • Parsley - Add whole sprigs of parsley to your soup as you prepare  it, and then roughly chop some fresh parsley while the soup is cooking and flavors are melding.  After you’ve portioned out the soup into bowls, add that fresh parsley at the end, just before you eat it!

  • Bunching Onions - Bunching onions (Allium fistulosum L.) produce no true bulbs, but are grown instead for their stems and leaves, which are used for flavoring many dishes. These perennial onions are grown as annuals or overwintered for harvest in early spring. Common onion varieties may be grown and harvested while the bulb is small, but unlike bunching onion varieties, they do develop a bulb if left in the ground until mature. There are many varieties of bunching onions requiring specific growing conditions.

  • Traviata Eggplant - Although grown and treated as a vegetable, eggplant is in fact a fruit, as it bears seeds within its flesh.

  • Sweet Potatoes - The star of this week’s recipe! Just in time for the holidays!

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Roasted Sweet Potato and Kale Quinoa Skillet with Sage (Serves 4)  The holiday season is upon us!  This recipe is a lovely addition to any Thanksgiving table with its robust autumnal flavors and an interesting spin on the ‘obligatory’ sweet potatoes.  This wonderful dish is a perfect respite from the heavier fare that is abundant during this time of year, make it for holiday meals and/or eat it in between.  You can also add feta or goat cheese if that makes your heart sing :) Thank you to With Food + Love for the recipe!

  • 3 tablespoons ghee (see notes)

  • 1/4 cup shallot minced

  • 2 medium sweet potatoes diced

  • 1 clove garlic minced

  • 1 tablespoon sage leaves chopped

  • 1 cup uncooked quinoa

  • 2 tablespoons white wine (see notes)

  • 2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth divided

  • 3 cups kale shredded {ribs removed}

  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley chopped

  • sea salt to taste

  • black pepper to taste

Heat the ghee over low heat in a large skillet. Add in the shallot and sweat for 1 minute.

Turn the heat up to medium and add in the sweet potatoes, stir and sauté for 2 minutes.

Then add in the garlic, sage and quinoa, stir and sauté for 2 minutes more. Turn up the heat to medium-high and add in the white wine. Stir, allow the liquid to evaporate somewhat.

Then add in 1 1/2 cups vegetable broth, stir, turn heat down to low, cover and cook for 12 minutes.

Remove the lid, add in the remaining broth, kale and parsley. Stir and simmer uncovered for 3 minutes or until the kale is bright green, and the sweet potatoes and quinoa are tender.

Season with salt and pepper and serve warm.

Notes

Equal parts lemon juice or apple cider vinegar can be subbed in for the white wine. Olive oil or butter can be used in place of the ghee.


Pic of the Week:

Happy Holidays to you and yours!

Happy Holidays to you and yours!

November 14, 2018

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Arugula - Grown as an edible herb in the Mediterranean area since Roman times, it was mentioned by various classical authors as an aphrodisiac, most famously in a poem long ascribed to the famous Roman poet Virgil.  Some writers assert that for this reason during the Middle Ages it was forbidden to grow rocket in monasteries

  • Poblano Hot Peppers - When traditionally ripened to red and dried, this pepper is known as an ‘Ancho’; it is also used green, as a ‘Poblano’, for making chiles rellenos.

  • Rosemary - Like the essence of a Mediterranean summer distilled into a sweet herbal syrup. Stir it into lemonade, flavor a cocktail, glaze a cake, or churn it into a sorbet. So refreshing. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.  Combine 1 c water, 1 c white sugar, and ¼ c rosemary leaves in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring until sugar dissolves. Simmer for 1 minute. Remove from heat and let syrup steep, about 30 minutes. Pour syrup into a sterilized glass jar through a mesh strainer to remove rosemary leaves; let cool.

  • Leeks - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Hansel and Gretel Eggplant - To roast these delicious little eggplants: Rinse them under cold running water, and dry them with a clean paper towel. Lay the eggplants on a parchment-lined baking sheet, and puncture them several times with a sharp knife. This vents steam as they roast, and prevents the eggplants from exploding.  Roast in a preheated oven at 425℉ until the eggplants are tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, approximately 15 minutes depending on size. They will collapse somewhat as they cook, which is normal for any eggplant. Cool the roasted eggplants slightly, until they can be handled. Slice and serve hot, or cool to room temperature for marinating or other preparations.

  • Green Cabbage - All those people who tell you to discard the cabbage’s core? Don’t listen to them. Very thinly sliced, it’s absolutely delicious.

    Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

TBA

 

Recipe

Roasted Leek and White Bean Galette (Makes one large - that can be cut into 8 appetizer-portion wedges - or four smaller ones ) Looking for some ideas for Thanksgiving dinner?  Whether you’re looking for another vegetarian side or an appetizer, this recipe offers delicious fall flavors and a pretty visual.  Thank you to Smitten Kitchen for the dish!

For the pastry:

  • 1 1/4 cups (160 grams) all-purpose flour

  • 1/4 teaspoon table salt

  • 8 tablespoons (4 oz or 115 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces and chill again

  • 1/4 cup (60 grams) plain yogurt or sour cream

  • 2 teaspoons (10 ml) fresh lemon juice

  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) ice water

For the filling

  • 6 small-to-medium leeks, dark green tops discarded, white and light green parts halved lengthwise

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

  • Kosher salt

  • Freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained

  • 1 garlic clove, minced

  • 1/4 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

  • 1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley

  • 2/3 cup grated gruyère cheese, divided

Glaze:

  • 1 egg yolk beaten with 1 teaspoon water


Make dough: Stir the flour and salt together in a large bowl. Sprinkle bits of butter over dough and, using a pastry blender or your fingertips, work it into the flour until the mixture resembles coarse meal, with the biggest pieces of butter the size of tiny peas. In a small bowl, stir together the sour cream, lemon juice and water and add this to the butter-flour mixture. With your fingertips or a wooden spoon, mix in the liquid until large lumps form. Pat the lumps into a ball. Wrap with plastic and refrigerate for 1 hour, or up to 2 days.

Meanwhile, prepare filling: Heat the oven to 400 degrees F. Arrange leeks cut-side-up in a large (9×13-inch) baking dish. Drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Flip the leeks so that their cut sides face down, add 3 tablespoons of water to the dish, cover tightly with aluminum foil and bake for 20 minutes until tender. Uncover and continue roasting the leeks for 10 to 15 minutes, or until caramelized. Leave oven on. Let leeks cool slightly, then chop into segments and place in a large bowl. Toss with beans, garlic, lemon zest, parsley, 1/2 cup grated cheese and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Assemble galettes: Divide dough into 4 pieces. On a floured counter, roll the first piece dough out into a roughly 8-inch round, although it really doesn’t need to be perfectly shaped. Transfer to a large parchment-lined baking sheet; I like to fold my dough gently, without creasing, in quarters then unfold it onto the baking pan. Sprinkle about 1/4 of the prepared filling into the center of the dough, leaving a 1 1/2-inch border. Sprinkle with about 1/4 of the remaining cheese. Fold the border over the filling, pleating the edge to make it fit. The center will be open. Brush crust with egg yolk glaze. Repeat with remaining dough and filling, making 4 small galettes.

Bake the galettes: For 25 to 30 minutes, until golden brown all over. Remove from the oven and let stand for 5 minutes, then slide the galette onto a serving plate. Or, if you’re planning ahead, let cool completely and refrigerate until needed. Gently rewarm before serving in a low oven.


Pic of the Week:

Haaaayyyyyyy!

Haaaayyyyyyy!