February 6, 2018

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Tokyo Turnips - Steamed these are nearly a delicacy! Choose turnips of equal size and wash them thoroughly under running water or soak them until any grit or sand falls away. You don’t need to remove the greens; you can actually use them as a bed for steaming.  Spread the turnips with greens attached on a steamer rack over boiling water, cover and cook until just barely tender, about 3 to 6 minutes depending upon the size of the turnips. (Choose turnips of equal size for even steaming of the bunch.)  When tender, drain the turnips and greens on a kitchen towel and serve with a side dish of salt or butter or pepper, or all three. Steaming turnips of any type will bring out the best flavor.

  • Purple Carrots - Make some delicious caramelized spiced carrots… Preheat oven to 375°F. Whisk 1/4 cup water, 1 cup pomegranate molasses, ¼ cup melted butter, ¼ cup finely grated peeled fresh ginger, 1 tsp ground cumin, 1/2 tsp ground cardamom, ¼ tsp ground nutmeg, and ¼ tsp cayenne in large bowl to blend. Add 4.5 lbs carrots (peeled, stems trimmed to ½ in) to pomegranate mixture and toss to coat. Divide carrots between 2 large rimmed baking sheets. Roast until carrots are tender and liquids are reduced to glaze, stirring twice and mixing in water by tablespoonfuls if needed to prevent burning, about 55 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 4 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Rewarm in 375°F oven 10 minutes before serving.)  Transfer carrots to platter. Sprinkle ¾ cup pomegranate seeds, ¾ cup toasted pine nuts, ¼ cup thinly sliced fresh basil leaves and mint, respectively, over carrots and serve.

  • Savoy Cabbage - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Loose Spinach - A perfect filling for your quesadillas!

  • Celeriac with Tops - Like all root vegetables, celery root is quite flexible, taking well to roasting, braising, or simmering.  Celery root needs to be peeled, and be aggressive when you do it. Remove all of the slightly hairy brown exterior to reveal the creamy, solid flesh inside. I'm not kidding. Seriously, peel or cut off all the brown stuff before jumping into prepping any recipe. That fibrous peel is not fun to bite into.  Celeriac's leaves and stalks are edible and can be used to flavor soup stocks, but use sparingly as they are more potent than common celery. The leaves can also by thinly sliced and used in place of celery leaves or parsley.

  • Red Radishes - Eat your radishes with a creamy ricotta dip! Place 1 cup ricotta (preferably fresh) in a small bowl, drizzle with 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, and sprinkle with 1/8 teaspoon each kosher salt and black pepper.  Serve with 2 bunches trimmed radishes.

  • Brussels Sprouts -  In common names and misspelling, they may also be called brussels sprouts, Brussel sprouts, or brussel sprouts.

Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

Tokyo Turnips, Brussels, Savoy Cabbage, Lacinato Kale, Red Radishes, Celeriac with Tops, Purple Carrots

 

Recipe

Winter Slaw with Farro (Serves 6-8)  Upend the trendy grain salad by maximizing the greens!  This fantastic seasonal recipe is from Deb Perelman’s newest book, Smitten Kitchen Every Day.  Sub with any of your favorite dried fruits or salty cheeses as you make the recipe your own….

  • 1/2 cup (100g) finely diced dried apricots
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) white wine vinegar, plus more to taste
  • 1 small-medium (2 pounds or a bit less than 1kg) head green savoy cabbage
  • 1 1/3 cups (145g) cooked farro, cooled (from about 3/4 cup uncooked)
  • 1/3 cup (45g) roughly chopped roasted almonds
  • 2 ounces (55g) Parmesan, thinly shaved on a grater with a vegetable peeler
  • 3 tablespoons (45ml) olive oil, plus more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Place the apricots in a small bowl with the vinegar, and set aside while preparing the other ingredients.

Cut the cabbage in half, and remove the core (and eat the core as a crunchy snack); then cut the halves again so you have quarters. With a mandolin or a knife, slice the cabbage into very thin ribbons. You’ll have about 12 cups total, which will seem ridiculous, but it will wilt down with dressing on it. Pile it into your largest bowl.

Add to the bowl the apricots and their vinegar, the farro, almonds, and most of the Parmesan, plus the olive oil, salt, and a good helping of freshly ground pepper. Toss to combine, and try to give it 15 minutes to let the ingredients settle a little before making seasoning adjustments; then add more vinegar, Parmesan, oil, salt, and pepper to taste. Perelman emphasizes this: "With so few ingredients and most of them fairly mildly flavored, you cannot skimp on seasoning or texture; I hope everyone toasts their almonds well and uses salt and pepper until all the flavors are lifted/present."

Heap the slaw on plates in piles, and top with remaining Parmesan. The slaw's textures are best for serving to company at this point, but this will keep for up to 1 week in the fridge for great take-to-work lunches.

 

Pic of the Week:

 Still reeling from another awesome  EcoFarm  Conference! Seven of us from the farm attended. The conference is an annual opportunity to reconnect with other farmers, get inspired, learn, celebrate, and honor those who passed. Congratulations to our friends JSM Organics,  Veritable Vegetable , and others, who were recognized by the community for all of their hard work in the name of a better world.  #ecofarm2018

Still reeling from another awesome EcoFarm Conference! Seven of us from the farm attended. The conference is an annual opportunity to reconnect with other farmers, get inspired, learn, celebrate, and honor those who passed. Congratulations to our friends JSM Organics, Veritable Vegetable, and others, who were recognized by the community for all of their hard work in the name of a better world. #ecofarm2018