February 20, 2018

What’s in the box this week?

Standard Shares include

  • Tokyo Turnips - For miso-glazed turnips: Combine 1 lb small turnips (trimmed, scrubbed, cut into 1” wedges), 2 tbsp white miso, 2 tbsp unsalted butter, and 1 tsp sugar in a medium skillet, then add water just to cover vegetables. Season with Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper.  Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and cook turnips, turning occasionally, until they are tender and liquid is evaporated, 15–20 minutes.  Once all the liquid has cooked off, keep cooking turnips, tossing occasionally, until they are golden brown and caramelized and the sauce thickens and glazes the vegetables, about 5 minutes longer.  Add 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice and a splash of water to pan and swirl to coat turnips. Season with salt and pepper.

  • Purple Carrots - Fresh young carrots aren’t likely to have bitter skin, so leave the peeler in the drawer and just give them a good scrub to get the dirt off before cooking.

  • Green Cabbage - Cabbage Caesar: Before doing anything, rub the bowl with a garlic clove; add an egg yolk, a few chopped anchovies, 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan, juice of 1 lemon, 6 tbsp olive oil, salt and pepper. Whisk to combine; add the cabbage (any kind), and toss.

  • Bloomsdale Spinach - The star of this week’s recipe!

  • Leeks - You can use the whole thing - the dark green portion is usually often because it has a tough texture, but it can be sautéed, or more commonly added to stock for flavor.

  • Cherry Radishes - Most people don’t really get excited about radishes, but that’s just because they’ve never eaten them served on top of a piece of buttered bread with salt. This simple meal ― made famous by the French ― is a revelation and makes it clear just how great this peppery root vegetable can be.

Egg Shares include eggs from our certified organic, pasture-raised, happy hens.

 

Vegetable Forecast

Tokyo Turnips, Brussels sprouts, Bloomsdale Spinach, Cherry Radishes, Leeks, Purple Carrots 

 

Recipe

Spiced Spinach with Walnuts  (Serves 6) Heidi from 101 Cookbooks says, “Simply stated, this is a spinach recipe you should try. It's an adaptable dish that downshifts seamlessly from main attraction to supporting role depending on the quantity of leftovers at hand. The jist: a hot pan filled with all manner of things that work well with spinach - toasted walnuts, shredded mint, lemon, a host of spices, and a good amount of leeks that are cooked until silky tender. Loaded with spinach greens and healthful spices like turmeric and cumin - this is the sort of preparation I favor, in part, because it adds such a nutritional punch to my day while still being interesting, satisfying, and easy to pull together.

  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil, ghee, or clarified butter
  • 3/4 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
  • 4 large leeks, trimmed & thinly sliced
  • 3/4 teaspoon chile flakes, or more to taste
  • 3/4 teaspoon cumin seeds, lightly crushed
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 3/4 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 40 fresh mint leaves
  • 4-5 massive handfuls of spinach, very roughly chopped
  • 1 lemon, cut into wedges
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, toasted
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta, fresh ricotta, or fresh paneer

In a large skillet or pot heat the oil over medium-high heat. Stir in the salt and leeks, and cook until tender - just barely starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Stir in the chile flakes, cumin seeds, turmeric, and oregano, and cook for another 30 seconds or so. Add the mint leaves and the spinach, in batches if needed, stirring constantly. Cook until the spinach begins to wilt, and brightens - just a minute or so. Squeeze the juice of one of the lemon wedges into the spinach, stir well, taste, and adjust with more salt if necessary. Serve topped with the walnuts and crumbled cheese.

 

Pic of the Week:

 Surprised at just how many groups of bats are streaming out of our little bat box here up high on the border of our vegetable field. Each of these furry critters can consume thousands of pests every night! Truly, the ecology of even our small farm is mind-boggling and awesome.

Surprised at just how many groups of bats are streaming out of our little bat box here up high on the border of our vegetable field. Each of these furry critters can consume thousands of pests every night! Truly, the ecology of even our small farm is mind-boggling and awesome.